prostheticknowledge:

Rocking Knit 

A rocking chair-powered knitting machine that can make winter hats, put together for ECAL’s exhibition called “Low Tech Factory” by Damien Ludi and Colin Peillex. Video embedded below:

ECAL Low-Tech Factory/Rocking-Knit from ECAL on Vimeo.

“Rocking-Knit” is a new interpretation of the rocking chair. It offers its user productive moments of relaxation. The to-and-fro movement of this armchair knits hats for the winter and requires no exertion whatsoever.

You can find out more about the exhibition at ECAL here

(via malphalent)

sciencecenter:

A bioluminescent Parapandulus shrimp
Beautiful image, right? Oh, by the way, that blue stuff is shrimp puke.

To produce these van Gogh-like swirls, the shrimp vomits up chemicals that react together to produce light. This particular shrimp was photographed in the Bahamas, during an expedition in the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible near the sea floor. The mission? To poke sea creatures and see if they would glow.

sciencecenter:

A bioluminescent Parapandulus shrimp

Beautiful image, right? Oh, by the way, that blue stuff is shrimp puke.

To produce these van Gogh-like swirls, the shrimp vomits up chemicals that react together to produce light. This particular shrimp was photographed in the Bahamas, during an expedition in the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible near the sea floor. The mission? To poke sea creatures and see if they would glow.

(via alscientist)

prussiahasinvaded:

ichthyologist:

Net Casting Spider (Deinopis sp.)
The net casting spider is named for its strange hunting behavior.
The spider casts a net made of sticky coils of silk and suspends it between its front legs, while dangling above a surface. When prey passes under it, the spider propels itself forward, casting its net over the prey and trapping it in the silk.
El Cucurucho on Flickr

I find this both amazing and terrifying 

prussiahasinvaded:

ichthyologist:

Net Casting Spider (Deinopis sp.)

The net casting spider is named for its strange hunting behavior.

The spider casts a net made of sticky coils of silk and suspends it between its front legs, while dangling above a surface. When prey passes under it, the spider propels itself forward, casting its net over the prey and trapping it in the silk.

El Cucurucho on Flickr

I find this both amazing and terrifying 

(via inpiscinationstation)

sciencecenter:

Carl Linnaeus and his Autoscopic Double
Carl Linnaeus is most famous for being the father of modern taxonomy. But as chronicled in his new book Hallucinations, Dr. Oliver Sacks describes how Linnaeus is notorious for something quite different - he saw himself in double. 

Linnaeus suffered from migraine attacks, and according to neurologist Macdonald Critchley, when his headaches came on, he’d hallucinate. A second, phantom Carl Linnaeus would often appear — seen only by the first — and would float about, doing whatever Real Carl was doing. So Linnaeus would be in his garden, checking out a plant or plucking a flower, and he could see, at a respectful distance, the Other Carl stooping and plucking the same way at the same time. Linnaeus didn’t fear his phantom; in fact he got used to it.
As Critchley describes it, the phantom might sit in Linnaeus’ seat at his library desk, and Real Linnaeus, would, presumably, ignore him. One time, Professor Linnaeus was lecturing at his university and decided to run down to his office to fetch a specimen to show the class, and Critchley says, he got to his office, “He opened the door rapidly, intending to enter, but pulled up at once saying, ‘Oh! I’m there already.’ “

Sacks describes this totally-not-made-up condition as something called autoscopy, and though it’s obviously not common, there is quite a bit already known about autoscopic doubles. For example, autoscopic doubles are always mirror images, so one’s right side is transposed onto the left side and vice versa. Sacks also explains how “the double is a purely visual phenomenon, with no identity or intentionality of its own. It has no desires and takes no initiatives; it is passive and neutral.” Autoscopic doubles are also accompanied by unpleasant symptoms like migraines, epilepsy, post-traumatic disorders, and other brain issues. But man, wouldn’t it be fascinating to have a double for just a day or two?

sciencecenter:

Carl Linnaeus and his Autoscopic Double

Carl Linnaeus is most famous for being the father of modern taxonomy. But as chronicled in his new book Hallucinations, Dr. Oliver Sacks describes how Linnaeus is notorious for something quite different - he saw himself in double. 

Linnaeus suffered from migraine attacks, and according to neurologist Macdonald Critchley, when his headaches came on, he’d hallucinate. A second, phantom Carl Linnaeus would often appear — seen only by the first — and would float about, doing whatever Real Carl was doing. So Linnaeus would be in his garden, checking out a plant or plucking a flower, and he could see, at a respectful distance, the Other Carl stooping and plucking the same way at the same time. Linnaeus didn’t fear his phantom; in fact he got used to it.

As Critchley describes it, the phantom might sit in Linnaeus’ seat at his library desk, and Real Linnaeus, would, presumably, ignore him. One time, Professor Linnaeus was lecturing at his university and decided to run down to his office to fetch a specimen to show the class, and Critchley says, he got to his office, “He opened the door rapidly, intending to enter, but pulled up at once saying, ‘Oh! I’m there already.’ “

Sacks describes this totally-not-made-up condition as something called autoscopy, and though it’s obviously not common, there is quite a bit already known about autoscopic doubles. For example, autoscopic doubles are always mirror images, so one’s right side is transposed onto the left side and vice versa. Sacks also explains how “the double is a purely visual phenomenon, with no identity or intentionality of its own. It has no desires and takes no initiatives; it is passive and neutral.” Autoscopic doubles are also accompanied by unpleasant symptoms like migraines, epilepsy, post-traumatic disorders, and other brain issues. But man, wouldn’t it be fascinating to have a double for just a day or two?

Just something to think about.

check-yo-facts:

nievietie:

Something I thought tumblr peeps might want to know about.

Sir Isaac Newton was gay. The man who discovered gravity and gave it a name was involved with a swiss mathematician, Nicolas Fatio.

Sadly, their relationship ( supposedly) ended badly after 4 years as Fatio began threatening Newton that he would expose his alchemy studies to the public ( keep in mind Newton held himself as a man of science and thought magic would discredit him).

First and foremost, correlation does not prove causation. The mere relationship between two people isn’t grounds for proof of any sexual activity. Newton was as far as anyone can tell non-sexual [source] (something also shared with Tesla). All evidence we can find for Newton’s homosexuality seems largely based off the fact that he didn’t commit to heterosexual relationships and never in fact married [source]. Furthermore Newton was strongly Christian which implies he may never have engaged in any sexual encounter even a heterosexual one.

Any claim that he was homosexual is based purely on conjecture and a romantic interpretation of his letters and not on hard evidence [source].

freshphotons:

“The image is the result of fiber tractography from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. It illustrates the white matter of the brain, or in other words, its structural connections. The red smooth surface represents a glioblastoma tumor. We can see the effect of repulsion and infiltration of this mass on the white matter fiber pathways. A distance colormap is used for interpretation. Blue fibers mean that they are located within a safe distance of the tumor whereas red fibers are in a close perimeter to the tumor, and can cause severe post-operation deficits, if resected.” -Cerebral Infiltration, Maxime Chamberland, David Fortin, Maxime Descoteaux, Sherbrooke Connectivity Imaging Lab. 

freshphotons:

The image is the result of fiber tractography from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. It illustrates the white matter of the brain, or in other words, its structural connections. The red smooth surface represents a glioblastoma tumor. We can see the effect of repulsion and infiltration of this mass on the white matter fiber pathways. A distance colormap is used for interpretation. Blue fibers mean that they are located within a safe distance of the tumor whereas red fibers are in a close perimeter to the tumor, and can cause severe post-operation deficits, if resected.” -Cerebral Infiltration, Maxime Chamberland, David Fortin, Maxime Descoteaux, Sherbrooke Connectivity Imaging Lab. 

(via freshphotons)

sci-fact:


 “ I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician: he is also a child placed before natural phenomena which impress him like a fairy tale. ”                              ~ Marie Curie; (Born 145 years ago today, November 7, 1867)



"All my life through, the new sights of Nature made me rejoice like a child."-Pierre Curie

sci-fact:

“ I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician: he is also a child placed before natural phenomena which impress him like a fairy tale. ”
                              ~ Marie Curie; (Born 145 years ago today, November 7, 1867)

"All my life through, the new sights of Nature made me rejoice like a child."
-Pierre Curie

(via sagansense)

gyrkinlens:

underplay:

hey you

stop scrolling and just look at this picture of a baby giraffe

okay that’s all carry on

That is not a giraffe.

It’s a dik-dik (Madoqua), a tiny antelope native to eastern and southern Africa.



They only grow to be about two feet long and weigh only about 15 pounds. 
Being so small, pretty much everything on the savanna can eat them.
 

Reblogging for truth.

(via wyeasttokaala)

project-argus:

acquaintedwithrask:

kqedscience:

Neil deGrasse Tyson reveals location of Superman’s home planet
“Having jumped ship from the Daily Planet, Superman has found his actual intergalactic home with a little help from a mere mortal, albeit a very brainy one.
Astrophysicist Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson will appear in a new Superman comic out Wednesday which reveals where Superman’s home planet of Krypton is in our actual universe.”

Well played, DC.  Well played


I’m just going to reblog every picture of Neil I can find from this comic.

project-argus:

acquaintedwithrask:

kqedscience:

Neil deGrasse Tyson reveals location of Superman’s home planet

Having jumped ship from the Daily Planet, Superman has found his actual intergalactic home with a little help from a mere mortal, albeit a very brainy one.

Astrophysicist Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson will appear in a new Superman comic out Wednesday which reveals where Superman’s home planet of Krypton is in our actual universe.”

Well played, DC.  Well played

I’m just going to reblog every picture of Neil I can find from this comic.