The Geology of the Moon.It may not occur to you when you look up at the night sky that the moon has a rich and interesting geology in itself. It’s been carved out, not just by impacts but also by lava and volcanoes. This may seem extraordinary, but when we think of the origins of the moon it’s not so hard to believe.Around 4.5 billion years ago it’s theorized that a protoplanet named Theia collided with the molten Earth. This collision spat out one, or possibly two, large pieces of debris. This molten rock then coalesced into what we today know as the moon, however it was still incredibly different. Instead this young moon was rife with volcanic activity, forming lava tubes, tectonic features and even small volcanoes (pictured here on the left) that we can see today. But eventually the moon did cool and in the process took on a form more representative of Earth even with it’s own little iron core and partial melt zones kept warm by residual heat from that initial impact.

The Geology of the Moon.

It may not occur to you when you look up at the night sky that the moon has a rich and interesting geology in itself. It’s been carved out, not just by impacts but also by lava and volcanoes. This may seem extraordinary, but when we think of the origins of the moon it’s not so hard to believe.

Around 4.5 billion years ago it’s theorized that a protoplanet named Theia collided with the molten Earth. This collision spat out one, or possibly two, large pieces of debris. This molten rock then coalesced into what we today know as the moon, however it was still incredibly different. Instead this young moon was rife with volcanic activity, forming lava tubes, tectonic features and even small volcanoes (pictured here on the left) that we can see today. But eventually the moon did cool and in the process took on a form more representative of Earth even with it’s own little iron core and partial melt zones kept warm by residual heat from that initial impact.