SOUP by Mandy Barker

These pieces of environmental art portray scenes involving pieces of litter. In particular pieces of litter were found from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch which is located in the north Pacific. The Garbage patch is formed due to an oceanic gyre, which is a large rotating ocean current that acts to trap waste particles. The size of the garbage patch is unknown but is estimated to be between 700,000 (270,000) and 15,000,000 square kilometres (5,800,000 sq mi), up to 8% of the North Pacific’s total area. The total mass of this plastic is estimated at 100 million tonnes.

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Ever wondered what flavors look like? Here you go!

Each one of these shows some chemical present in your every day food that contributes to the flavors you know and love seen through the microscope!

Top: capsaicin from chillis
Middle: glucose (sugar), catechin (present in teas) and honey
Bottom: some stuff from strawberries and lettuce!

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Hydro Organisms Responsive To Urban StimuliOr HORTUS for short is an attempt to bring the truth of green energy into the faces of the public designed by EcoLogicStudios. Part science and part art exhibition it features 325 ‘photobioreactor’ bags suspended from the sealing each filled with algae. All in all 9 different species of energy producing algae are represented with an additional 25 larger sacs containing bioluminescent bacteria. Visitors are also encouraged to give the “breath of life”, so to speak, by blowing into the bags and donating carbon dioxide for the algae to feed off. Each bag also has QR codes to inform visitors about the algae they just helped to grow.HORTUS can be seen in London at the Architectural Association until February.

Hydro Organisms Responsive To Urban Stimuli

Or HORTUS for short is an attempt to bring the truth of green energy into the faces of the public designed by EcoLogicStudios. Part science and part art exhibition it features 325 ‘photobioreactor’ bags suspended from the sealing each filled with algae. All in all 9 different species of energy producing algae are represented with an additional 25 larger sacs containing bioluminescent bacteria. Visitors are also encouraged to give the “breath of life”, so to speak, by blowing into the bags and donating carbon dioxide for the algae to feed off. Each bag also has QR codes to inform visitors about the algae they just helped to grow.

HORTUS can be seen in London at the Architectural Association until February.

Forbidden ColoursThe news that there are “colours” that you cannot see should not be new news to you. The idea that mixtures of colours based off the visible spectrum that you still cannot see may be however. Certain colours, such as pink, are mixtures of different wavelengths of light, but other colours that are mixtures simply cannot be perceived and sound a bit like a real life octarine. These are colours such as red-green and blue-yellow, which are not actually what you get when you mix the two, but really a reddish variety of green or a bluish yellow colour. So why can’t we see these colours? The answer lies in what are known as “opponent neurons” in the eye’s retina. When red is seen one type of these neurons will fire, which the brain sees as red, when green is seen the neuron is silent and this lack of signaling is perceived as green. Interestingly this is also the basis of Red-Green colour blindness. So although these colours actually exist, we cannot see them because we cannot have a neuron firing and not firing at the same time.

Forbidden Colours

The news that there are “colours” that you cannot see should not be new news to you. The idea that mixtures of colours based off the visible spectrum that you still cannot see may be however. Certain colours, such as pink, are mixtures of different wavelengths of light, but other colours that are mixtures simply cannot be perceived and sound a bit like a real life octarine. These are colours such as red-green and blue-yellow, which are not actually what you get when you mix the two, but really a reddish variety of green or a bluish yellow colour. So why can’t we see these colours? The answer lies in what are known as “opponent neurons” in the eye’s retina. When red is seen one type of these neurons will fire, which the brain sees as red, when green is seen the neuron is silent and this lack of signaling is perceived as green. Interestingly this is also the basis of Red-Green colour blindness. So although these colours actually exist, we cannot see them because we cannot have a neuron firing and not firing at the same time.

When Science and Art CollideI don’t always post about art, but when I do it’s pretty damn awesome. This kite is called “Three Cubes Colliding” and was conceived and designed by Ivan Morison and Sash Reading. The kite itself is made predominantly from aerospace fabric and more than 1700 connectors made using a 3D printer. Its design was inspired by the structure of pyrite along with Alexander Graham Bell’s (the inventor of the telephone) experiments and has a certain “bucky quality” to it.

When Science and Art Collide

I don’t always post about art, but when I do it’s pretty damn awesome. This kite is called “Three Cubes Colliding” and was conceived and designed by Ivan Morison and Sash Reading. The kite itself is made predominantly from aerospace fabric and more than 1700 connectors made using a 3D printer. Its design was inspired by the structure of pyrite along with Alexander Graham Bell’s (the inventor of the telephone) experiments and has a certain “bucky quality” to it.

Through the Eyes of a ButterflyThis image is part of the Princeton University Art of Science competition and has been generated to show what a Great Spangled Fritillary Butterfly looks like through the compound eyes of one of it’s own at varying distances ranging from 7 cm (bottom left) to 4.3 metres (top left). Courtship rituals typically occurring with the butterflies 18 cms apart which corresponds to the top right image.

Through the Eyes of a Butterfly

This image is part of the Princeton University Art of Science competition and has been generated to show what a Great Spangled Fritillary Butterfly looks like through the compound eyes of one of it’s own at varying distances ranging from 7 cm (bottom left) to 4.3 metres (top left). Courtship rituals typically occurring with the butterflies 18 cms apart which corresponds to the top right image.

I Ship Science and ArtThis time by Richard Box I think. This one is more sciencey and something I’ve always wanted to try, basically it’s a whole bunch of fluorescent tubes stuck into the ground beneath electrical cables. The cool thing? No wires are connected to the tubes, they’re working solely off the electrical field generated by the high voltage cables over head.

I Ship Science and Art

This time by Richard Box I think. This one is more sciencey and something I’ve always wanted to try, basically it’s a whole bunch of fluorescent tubes stuck into the ground beneath electrical cables. The cool thing? No wires are connected to the tubes, they’re working solely off the electrical field generated by the high voltage cables over head.

Field of Lights by Bruce MunroOkay, so not science, in fact: art (but who says the two are mutually exclusive?). This is an art installation called Field of Lights by Bruce Munro outside something called the V&A in Britain. The installation uses 5,000 bulbs stuck into the ground that are hooked up to one of 11 projectors by around 24,000 metres of fiber optic cable (science!) leading to something that I find incredibly beautiful (art?).

Field of Lights by Bruce Munro

Okay, so not science, in fact: art (but who says the two are mutually exclusive?). This is an art installation called Field of Lights by Bruce Munro outside something called the V&A in Britain. The installation uses 5,000 bulbs stuck into the ground that are hooked up to one of 11 projectors by around 24,000 metres of fiber optic cable (science!) leading to something that I find incredibly beautiful (art?).

Kirlain photography is a method of photographing the electrical discharge of various objects, the process involves placing said object upon a photographic plate and running a voltage across it. This outlines the subject, in this case a set of leaves, with a corona of electrical energy that is only visible on the plate.

Kirlain photography is a method of photographing the electrical discharge of various objects, the process involves placing said object upon a photographic plate and running a voltage across it. This outlines the subject, in this case a set of leaves, with a corona of electrical energy that is only visible on the plate.

Dyeing fish and making them transparent seems to be all the rage these days. So here’s a cool picture of a frog that’s undergone the same treatment. The treatment itself consists of staining bones and cartilage and then using enzymes to render the actual flesh transparent but not actually removing it.

Dyeing fish and making them transparent seems to be all the rage these days. So here’s a cool picture of a frog that’s undergone the same treatment. The treatment itself consists of staining bones and cartilage and then using enzymes to render the actual flesh transparent but not actually removing it.