When 135 Million Years Old You Reach, Look This Good You Will NotI just had to post this because it’s a stunningly preserved fossil of a predatory theropod. This specimen is about 72 cm in length and is yet to be identified and cataloged.

When 135 Million Years Old You Reach, Look This Good You Will Not

I just had to post this because it’s a stunningly preserved fossil of a predatory theropod. This specimen is about 72 cm in length and is yet to be identified and cataloged.

goodkernel:

Dracorex hogwartsia, “Dragon king of Hogwarts”
It is known from one nearly complete skull and a few vertebrae. These were discovered in the Hell Creek Formation in South Dakota. It is now suspected to be mearly a juvenile form of Pachycephalosaurus. Regardless, this creature wins the prize for the dinosaur with the coolest name.

goodkernel:

Dracorex hogwartsia, “Dragon king of Hogwarts”

It is known from one nearly complete skull and a few vertebrae. These were discovered in the Hell Creek Formation in South Dakota. It is now suspected to be mearly a juvenile form of Pachycephalosaurus. Regardless, this creature wins the prize for the dinosaur with the coolest name.

northerngeologyboy:

A specimen of Isotelus rex, from Churchill, Manitoba, is the largest complete trilobite ever found. Discovered by Dave Rudkin (Royal Ontario Museum), Robert Elias (University of Manitoba), Graham Young (Manitoba Museum) and Edward Dobrzanske (Manitoba Museum) in 1999, it measures 720 millimetres (28 in) in length, 400 millimetres (16 in) in maximum width (across the cephalon) and 70 millimetres (3 in) in maximum height (at the posterior mid-point of the cephalon).

northerngeologyboy:

A specimen of Isotelus rex, from Churchill, Manitoba, is the largest complete trilobite ever found. Discovered by Dave Rudkin (Royal Ontario Museum), Robert Elias (University of Manitoba), Graham Young (Manitoba Museum) and Edward Dobrzanske (Manitoba Museum) in 1999, it measures 720 millimetres (28 in) in length, 400 millimetres (16 in) in maximum width (across the cephalon) and 70 millimetres (3 in) in maximum height (at the posterior mid-point of the cephalon).

Trilobites are one of those constants in the childhood of scientifically minded and as I like to think that of “normal” children. They’re bizarre and alien looking yet lived on our planet a mere 250 million years ago. What I find most bizarre and alien however is their eyes. Trilobites had quite complex compound eyes, however the really remarkable thing is that the lenses were made of rock. Specifically calcite for the geologists and calcium carbonate for the chemists.

Trilobites are one of those constants in the childhood of scientifically minded and as I like to think that of “normal” children. They’re bizarre and alien looking yet lived on our planet a mere 250 million years ago. What I find most bizarre and alien however is their eyes. Trilobites had quite complex compound eyes, however the really remarkable thing is that the lenses were made of rock. Specifically calcite for the geologists and calcium carbonate for the chemists.

migeo:

Orthoceras fosiles (by Ametxa)
Orthoceras (“straight horn”) is a genus of extinct nautiloid cephalopod. This genus is sometimes called Orthoceratites. Orthoceras fossils are common and have a global distribution, occurring in any marine rock, especially limestones.These are slender, elongate shells with the middle of the body chamber transversely constricted, and a subcentral orthochoanitic siphuncle. The surface is ornamented by a network of fine lirae.

migeo:

Orthoceras fosiles (by Ametxa)

Orthoceras (“straight horn”) is a genus of extinct nautiloid cephalopod. This genus is sometimes called Orthoceratites. Orthoceras fossils are common and have a global distribution, occurring in any marine rock, especially limestones.These are slender, elongate shells with the middle of the body chamber transversely constricted, and a subcentral orthochoanitic siphuncle. The surface is ornamented by a network of fine lirae.

Okay first proper post in awhile. What we have here is a recently discovered fossil that has been nicknamed the “walking cactus” that lived 520 million years ago. The importance of this discovery is it is a sort of missing link (Even though I don’t agree with the term) between creatures similar to velvet worms and arthopods (spiders, crustaceans etc). Isn’t life wonderful that it can create all these bizarre organisms?

Okay first proper post in awhile. What we have here is a recently discovered fossil that has been nicknamed the “walking cactus” that lived 520 million years ago. The importance of this discovery is it is a sort of missing link (Even though I don’t agree with the term) between creatures similar to velvet worms and arthopods (spiders, crustaceans etc). Isn’t life wonderful that it can create all these bizarre organisms?

QuickpostbeforeIgotowork!Up there is a species of giant sea scorpion (More specifically: Jaekelopterus rhenaniae) which is very much thankfully dead, otherwise I would never go in the water, ever. At the top you can see it’s size compared to a man (2.5 metres or 8.2 feet) and down the bottom a fossilized claw measuring at 46 cm (too lazy to work out inches). This monster lived approximately 390 million years and scarily enough it’s only the largest arthopod by 30 cms (about 10 inches).

QuickpostbeforeIgotowork!
Up there is a species of giant sea scorpion (More specifically: Jaekelopterus rhenaniae) which is very much thankfully dead, otherwise I would never go in the water, ever. At the top you can see it’s size compared to a man (2.5 metres or 8.2 feet) and down the bottom a fossilized claw measuring at 46 cm (too lazy to work out inches). This monster lived approximately 390 million years and scarily enough it’s only the largest arthopod by 30 cms (about 10 inches).

So you may know how sharks constantly replenish their supply of teeth through out their lives. However it wasn’t always this simple. Helicoprion up there found another way to get around teeth blunting or damage, like modern sharks it continued to grow teeth throughout it’s life, unlike modern sharks however it didn’t lose them, thus along with the teeth growing so did the the lower jaw causing the notable spiral. Just be glad this thing is long extinct… as far as we know.

So you may know how sharks constantly replenish their supply of teeth through out their lives. However it wasn’t always this simple. Helicoprion up there found another way to get around teeth blunting or damage, like modern sharks it continued to grow teeth throughout it’s life, unlike modern sharks however it didn’t lose them, thus along with the teeth growing so did the the lower jaw causing the notable spiral. Just be glad this thing is long extinct… as far as we know.