I started inventing things, and I couldn’t stop, like beavers, which I know about. People think they cut down trees so they can build dams, but in reality it’s because their teeth never stop growing, and if they didn’t constantly file them down by cutting through all of those trees, their teeth would start to grow into their own faces, which would kill them. That’s how my brain was.

- Oskar Schell, Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer

On the Invention of The Incandescent Light BulbTaking a break from science and delving more into history simply because I think there’s a great wrong being done here. Most of you will probably think that Edison invented the good old light bulb, but in reality that’s only about 1/4 right. You see the invention of the light bulb was something that had been building up for around 80 years, first with Humphrey Davy’s experiment near the turn of the 19th century on the light emitting qualities of filaments. Over the following decades small leaps were made in the field such as putting the filament in a vacuum tube to increase longevity and changing the composition of the filament from platinum to carbon. Finally we come to Sir Joseph Swan who in the year of 1878, an entire year before Edison (who incidentally only started work in the field AFTER Swan’s invention was well known), patented the light bulb design we see above. There are still other claims of incandescent lights prior to Swan, such as the notable works of Woodward (Whose patent you can view here) and Alexander Lodygin who filled for a Russian patent in 1874 that was the first to use the Tungsten filaments we use today.

On the Invention of The Incandescent Light Bulb

Taking a break from science and delving more into history simply because I think there’s a great wrong being done here. Most of you will probably think that Edison invented the good old light bulb, but in reality that’s only about 1/4 right. You see the invention of the light bulb was something that had been building up for around 80 years, first with Humphrey Davy’s experiment near the turn of the 19th century on the light emitting qualities of filaments. Over the following decades small leaps were made in the field such as putting the filament in a vacuum tube to increase longevity and changing the composition of the filament from platinum to carbon. Finally we come to Sir Joseph Swan who in the year of 1878, an entire year before Edison (who incidentally only started work in the field AFTER Swan’s invention was well known), patented the light bulb design we see above. There are still other claims of incandescent lights prior to Swan, such as the notable works of Woodward (Whose patent you can view here) and Alexander Lodygin who filled for a Russian patent in 1874 that was the first to use the Tungsten filaments we use today.